À la Une

Ability of the front-of-pack nutrition label Nutri-Score to discriminate nutritional quality of food products in 7 European countries (Spain, Switzerland, Belgium, Italy, UK, the Netherlands and Sweden) and consistency with nutritional recommendations

Fabien Szabo de Edelenyi1, Manon Egnell1, Pilar Galan1, Serge Hercberg1,2, Chantal Julia1,2

1 Université Paris 13, Equipe de Recherche en Epidémiologie Nutritionnelle (EREN), Centre de Recherche en Epidémiologie et Statistiques, Inserm (U1153), Inra(U1125), Cnam, COMUE Sorbonne Paris Cité, F-93017 Bobigny, France.

2 Département de Santé Publique, Hôpital Avicenne (AP-HP), F-93017 Bobigny, France

This report describes the ability of the Front-of-Pack nutrition Label (FoPL), namely the Nutri-Score, to discriminate the nutritional quality of pre-packed food products available in the markets of 7 different European countries and its consistency with global nutritional recommendations. It complements specific analysis previously published in scientific peer-reviews journals using the same methodology concerning the French [1] and the German food markets [2].

Material and methods

Food composition table

Data was retrieved the 9th of July from the Open Food Facts project database, a collaborative web project gathering food composition data based on available back-of-pack labeling of products. Data is collected by volunteer contributors and includes information about ingredients and nutrition facts from food products purchased in stores, effectively using crowdsourcing to collect food composition data of the food supply. The collected data is available freely as an open data source and can be downloaded for research purposes.

As the items in the database are collected from stores, foods and beverages included are exclusively manufactured pre-packaged foods. As the single identifier for a given food is the barcode of the food, identical products sold with various packagings (in different amounts mainly) may appear multiple times in the database. The open Food Facts database contains data from national brands, store brands and discount brands, and is available around the world.

Depending on the number of contributors in a given country, the number of products in the database may vary.For this report, we selected only the 7 Europeans countries with more than 1000 products available (Spain, Switzerland, Belgium, Italy, United Kingdom, Netherlands and Sweden).

Food classification

Foods were categorized using a consumer’s point of view, grouping foods with similar use and distinct nutritional characteristics. Main food groups included ‘Products containing mainly fruits and vegetables’, ‘Cereals and potatoes’, ‘Meat, Fish and Eggs’, ‘Milk and dairy products’, ‘Fats and sauces’, ‘Composite foods’, ‘Sugary snacks’, ‘Salty snacks’ and ‘Beverages’. Within each food group, sub-groups were identified (e.g. in the ‘Cereals and potatoes’, subcategories included ‘Bread’, ‘Cereals’, ‘Legumes’, ‘Potatoes’ and ‘Breakfast cereals’). Each food was categorized in a single food group and sub-group. Herbs and spices, or special use products were excluded from the database, as they are not included in the perimeter of the Nutri-Score application. The number of products available in each group or sub-group varied depending on the country. To avoid misleading representation due to a small number of items, only food groups for which more than 20 foods were available were shown in the graphics. Foods with an incomplete nutritional composition for the Nutri-Score computation were excluded, as well as foods with missing group labelling.

Analyses

FSA score computation

The Nutri-Score relies on the computation of a nutrient profiling system, originally developed in the United Kingdom by the Food Standards Agency (FSA) for the regulation of advertising to children [3-5]. It was adapted for the purpose of nutritional labelling in France by the High Council for Public health, with the goal of ensuring a high degree of alignment between the scoring system and the French nutritional recommendations [6-7]. For each product, the FSA score modified by the Health Council of Public Health (FSAm-NSP) was computed taking into account nutrient content for 100 g. The FSAm-NSP score allocates positive points (0-10) for content in energy (KJ), total sugars (g), saturated fatty acids (g) and sodium (mg). Negative points (0-5) are allocated to content in fruits, vegetables and nuts (%), fibers (g) and proteins (g). Final score, calculated as a combination of the positive and the negative points, is based on a discrete continuous scale ranging theoretically from -15 (higher nutritional quality) to +40 points (lower nutritional quality). Specific thresholds to attribute points in the different components are used for generic foods, cheese, beverages and fats and oils. Then, cut-off are applied in order to obtain the corresponding Nutri-Score: A below -1 point (in dark green), B from 0 to 2 points (green), C from 3 to 10 points (yellow), D from 11 to 18 points (orange) and E from 19 points and over (dark orange). For beverages, the thresholds were adapted, as follow: A only applied to water, B up to 1 point (green), C from 2 to 5 (yellow), D from 6 to 9 (orange) and E from 10 points and over (dark orange).

Statistical analyses

The distribution of the overall FSAm-NSP score was computed in the different food groups, and displayed using a boxplot, highlighting the median, 25th and 75th percentiles of the distribution. Distribution of foods and beverages in the different categories of the Nutri-Score were computed. Ability of the FoPL to discriminate nutritional quality of foods and beverages was estimated by the number of available colors in each group and sub-groups. When three or more colors were available in a food group, the discriminating ability of the Nutri-Score was considered good, in a pragmatic approach.

Page break

Results for Spain

For Spain, the OpenFoodFact table included 29 785 foods. From this list, 15982 products could not be affected to a specific food group and were deleted from the list. Then, 3639 products were removed because the nutritional informations necessary to the calculation of the NutriScore were missing. 11 products were deleted after additional quality controls. Finally, the OpenFoodFact table used for this document included 10 153 foods. The database contained 1132 products composed mainly of fruits and vegetables, 1919 bread and cereal products, 662 meat, fish and eggs products, 1544 milk and dairy, 809 fats and sauces, 586 composite dishes, 2137 sugary snacks, 667 salty snacks. Overall, the mean FSAm-NSP score was 7.5+/- 8.8 points.

The overall distribution of the FSAm-NSP score is represented in Figure 1.

Figure 1: Overall distribution of the FSAm-NSP score

The distribution of the Nutri-Score in the different food groups is represented in Figures 2, 3 and 4.

Figure 2: Distribution of the FSAm-NSP score for solid foods. Vertical lines represent the cut-offs of the 5-category Nutriscore. The boundary of the box nearest to the left indicates the 25th percentile, the line within the box marks the median, and the boundary of the box furthest from the left indicates the 75th percentile. Whiskers (error bars) left and right of the box indicate the lower limit (25th percentile – 1.5 * (Inter-quartile range) and the upper limit (75th percentile + 1.5 * (Inter-quartile range)). The circles are individual outlier points. *Products containing mainly fruits and vegetables

Figure 3: Distribution of the FSAm-NSP score for solid foods in subgroups containing more than 20 items.

Figure 4: Distribution of the FSAm-NSP score for beverages. Vertical lines represent the cut-offs of the 5-category Nutriscore. The boundary of the box nearest to the left indicates the 25th percentile, the line within the box marks the median, and the boundary of the box furthest from the left indicates the 75th percentile. Whiskers (error bars) left and right of the box indicate the lower limit (25th percentile – 1.5 * (Inter-quartile range) and the upper limit (75th percentile + 1.5 * (Inter-quartile range)). The circles are individual outlier points. By definition, only water is classified as A.

The distribution of the Nutri-Score within the different food groups is displayed in Table 1.

    A B C D E Total
Fruits and
vegetables*
  663
(58.6%)
169
(14.9%)
263
(23.2%)
32
(2.8%)
5
(0.4%)
1132
  Vegetables*** 510
(78%)
72
(11%)
64
(9.8%)
8
(1.2%)
0
(0%)
654
  Dried fruits 13
(15.9%)
15
(18.3%)
52
(63.4%)
2
(2.4%)
0
(0%)
82
  Fruits** 134
(61.2%)
8
(3.7%)
61
(27.9%)
13
(5.9%)
3
(1.4%)
219
  Soups 6
(3.4%)
74
(41.8%)
86
(48.6%)
9
(5.1%)
2
(1.1%)
177
Cereals and
potatoes
  688
(35.9%)
311
(16.2%)
408
(21.3%)
435
(22.7%)
77
(4%)
1919
  Bread 91
(17.4%)
86
(16.5%)
173
(33.1%)
162
(31%)
10
(1.9%)
522
  Cereals 379
(51.4%)
112
(15.2%)
97
(13.1%)
110
(14.9%)
40
(5.4%)
738
  Legumes 140
(58.6%)
58
(24,3 %)
14
(5.9%)
20
(8.4%)
7
(2.9%)
239
  Potatoes 16
(44.4%)
4
(11.1%)
15
(41.7%)
1
(2.8%)
0
(0%)
36
  Breakfast
cereals
62
(16.1%)
51
(13.3%)
109
(28.4%)
142
(37%)
20
(5.2%)
384
Fish Meat,
Eggs
  43
(6.5%)
114
(17.2%)
171
(25.8%)
215
(32.5%)
119
(18%)
662
  Fish and
seafood
28
(8.2%)
91
(26.6%)
122
(35.7%)
97
(28.4%)
4
(1.2%)
342
  Meat 4
(6.9%)
5
(8.6%)
14
(24.1%)
23
(39.7%)
12
(20.7%)
58
  Processed meat 2
(0.8%)
8
(3.3%)
35
(14.4%)
95
(39.1%)
103
(42.4%)
243
  Eggs 9
(47.4%)
10
(52,6 %)
0
(0%)
0
(0%)
0
(0%)
19
Milk and
dairy
products
  242
(15.7%)
576
(373%)
272
(17.6%)
377
(244%)
77
(5%)
1544
  Plant-based
milk
substitutes
78
(26%)
198
(66%)
14
(4.7%)
8
(2.7%)
2
(0.7%)
300
  Milk and
yogurt
147
(22.9%)
353
(55.1%)
122
(19%)
16
(2.5%)
3
(0.5%)
641
  Cheese 12
(3.6%)
4
(1.2%)
47
(14%)
255
(76.1%)
17
(5.1%)
335
  Dairy desserts 4
(6.5%)
10
(16.1%)
37
(59.7%)
11
(17.7%)
0
(0%)
62
  Ice cream 1
(0.5%)
11
(5.3%)
52
(25.2%)
87
(42.2%)
55
(26.7%)
206
Fat and
sauces
  44
(5.4%)
33
(4.1%)
284
(35.1%)
342
(42.3%)
106
(13.1%)
809
  Dressings and
sauces
43(7%) 33
(5.4%)
262
(42.9%)
208
(34%)
65
(10.6%)
611
  Fats 1
(0.5%)
0
(0%)
22
(11.1%)
134
(67.7%)
41
(20.7%)
198
Salty
snacks
  10
(1.5%)
45
(6.7%)
211
(31.6%)
352
(52.8%)
49
(7.3%)
667
  Appetizers 2
(0.7%)
11
(3.8%)
74
(25.3%)
191
(65.2%)
15
(5.1%)
293
  Nuts 6
(3.8%)
5
(3.2%)
36
(22.9%)
82
(52.2%)
28
(17.8%)
157
  Salty and fatty
products
2
(0.9%)
29
(13.4%)
101
(46.5%)
79
(36.4%)
6
(2.8%)
217
Sugary
snacks
  52
(2.4%)
153
(7.2%)
293
(13.7%)
752
(35.2%)
887
(41.5%)
2137
  Biscuits and
cakes
16
(1.9%)
31
(3.7%)
115
(13.6%)
309
(36.5%)
375
(44.3%)
846
  Chocolate
products
1
(0.2%)
5
(1.1%)
25
(5.3%)
132
(27.7%)
313
(65.8%)
476
  Sweets 35
(4.4%)
117
(14.9%)
151
(19.2%)
293
(37.2%)
191
(24.3%)
787
  pastries 0
(0%)
0
(0%)
2
(7.1%)
18
(64.3%)
8
(28.6%)
28
Composite
foods
  117
(20%)
150
(25.6%)
224
(38.2%)
89
(15.2%)
6
(1%)
586
  One-dish
meals
115
(24.1%)
135
(28.2%)
189
(39.5%)
37
(7.7%)
2
(0.4%)
478
  Pizza pies and
quiches
0
(0%)
7
(10%)
23
(32.9%)
37
(52.9%)
3
(4.3%)
70
  Sandwiches 2
(5.3%)
8
(21.1%)
12
(31.6%)
15
(39.5%)
1
(2.6%)
38
Beverages   260
(37.3%)
82
(11.8%)
151
(21.7%)
73
(10.5%)
131
(18.8%)
697
  Waters 260
(100%)
0
(0%)
0
(0%)
0
(0%)
0
(0%)
260
  Teas and
herbal teas
and coffees
0
(0%)
1
(14.3%)
2
(28.6%)
2
(28.6%)
2
(28.6%)
7
  Fruit juices 0
(0%)
49
(24.1%)
119
(58.6%)
28
(13.8%)
7
(3.4%)
203
  Fruit nectars 0
(0%)
0
(0%)
8
(19.5%)
15
(36.6%)
18
(43.9%)
41
  Artificially
sweetened
beverages
0
(0%)
27
(29.3%)
21
(22.8%)
18
(19.6%)
26
(28.3%)
92
  Sweetened
beverages
0
(0%)
5
(5.3%)
1
(1.1%)
10
(10.6%)
78
(83%)
94
Sum   2119
(20.9%)
1633
(16.1%)
2277
(22.4%)
2667
(26.3%)
1457
(14.4%)
10
153

Table 1: Distribution of the Nutri-Score within the different food groups. ** Fruits based products ; *** Vegetables based products.

Page break

Results for Switzerland

For Switzerland, the OpenFoodFact table included 34084 foods. From this list, 24468 products could not be affected to a specific food group and were deleted from the list. Then, 1105 products were removed because the nutritional informations necessary to the calculation of the NutriScore were missing. 18 products were deleted after additional quality controls. Finally, the OpenFoodFact table used for this document included 8493 foods. The database contained 588 products composed mainly of fruits and vegetables, 1303 bread and cereal products, 619 meat, fish and eggs products, 1358 milk and dairy, 731 fats and sauces, 630 composite dishes, 1972 sugary snacks, 427 salty snacks. Overall, the mean FSAm-NSP score was 9.2+/- 9.2 points.

The overall distribution of the FSAm-NSP score is represented in Figure 1.

Figure 1: Overall distribution of the FSAm-NSP score

The distribution of the Nutri-Score in the different food groups is represented in Figures 2, 3 and 4.

Figure 2: Distribution of the FSAm-NSP score for solid foods. Vertical lines represent the cut-offs of the 5-category Nutriscore. The boundary of the box nearest to the left indicates the 25th percentile, the line within the box marks the median, and the boundary of the box furthest from the left indicates the 75th percentile. Whiskers (error bars) left and right of the box indicate the lower limit (25th percentile – 1.5 * (Inter-quartile range) and the upper limit (75th percentile + 1.5 * (Inter-quartile range)). The circles are individual outlier points. *Products containing mainly fruits and vegetables »

Figure 3: Distribution of the FSAm-NSP score for solid foods in subgroups containing more than 20 items. Vertical lines represent the cut-offs of the 5-category Nutriscore. The boundary of the box nearest to the left indicates the 25th percentile, the line within the box marks the median, and the boundary of the box furthest from the left indicates the 75th percentile. Whiskers (error bars) left and right of the box indicate the lower limit (25th percentile – 1.5 * (Inter-quartile range) and the upper limit (75th percentile + 1.5 * (Inter-quartile range)). The circles are individual outlier points. ** Fruits based products ; *** Vegetables based products

Figure 4: Distribution of the FSAm-NSP score for beverages. Vertical lines represent the cut-offs of the 5-category Nutriscore. The boundary of the box nearest to the left indicates the 25th percentile, the line within the box marks the median, and the boundary of the box furthest from the left indicates the 75th percentile. Whiskers (error bars) left and right of the box indicate the lower limit (25th percentile – 1.5 * (Inter-quartile range) and the upper limit (75th percentile + 1.5 * (Inter-quartile range)). The circles are individual outlier points. By definition, only water is classified as A.

The distribution of the Nutri-Score within the different food groups is displayed in Table 1.

Table 1: Distribution of the Nutri-Score within the different food groups. ** Fruits based products ; *** Vegetables based products.

    A B C D E Total
Fruits and vegetables*   359
(61.1%)
89
(15.1%)
127
(21.6%)
12
(2%)
1
(0.2%)
588
  Vegetables*** 211
(77.9%)
36
(13.3%)
22
(8.1%)
1
(0.4%)
1
(0.4%)
271
  Dried
fruits
11
(11.7%)
28
(29.8%)
53
(56.4%)
2
(2.1%)
0
(0%)
94
  Fruits** 133
(76.4%)
5
(2.9%)
28
(16.1%)
8
(4.6%)
0
(0%)
174
  Soups 4
(8.2%)
20
(40.8%)
24
(49%)
1
(2%)
0
(0%)
49
Cereals
and
potatoes
  613
(47%)
234
(18%)
266
(20.4%)
159
(12.2%)
31
(2.4%)
1303
  Bread 74
(24.7%)
103
(34.3%)
84
(28%)
37
(12.3%)
2
(0.7%)
300
  Cereals 364
(64.7%)
66
(11.7%)
48
(8.5%)
62
(11%)
23
(4.1%)
563
  Legumes 60
(69%)
9
(10.3%)
5
(5.7%)
10
(11.5%)
3
(3.4%)
87
  Potatoes 34
(41%)
24
(28.9%)
24
(28.9%)
1
(1.2%)
0
(0%)
83
  Breakfast
cereals
81
(30%)
32
(11.9%)
105
(38.9%)
49
(18.1%)
3
(1.1%)
270
Fish Meat Eggs   71
(11.5%)
103
(16.6%)
127
(20.5%)
224
(36.2%)
94
(15.2%)
619
  Fish and
seafood
29
(13.1%)
73
(33%)
52
(23.5%)
66
(29.9%)
1
(0.5%)
221
  Meat 17
(9.8%)
23
(13.2%)
38
(21.8%)
80
(46%)
16
(9.2%)
174
  Processed meat 2
(1%)
5
(2.5%)
37
(18.8%)
76
(38.6%)
77
(39.1%)
197
  Eggs 23
(88.5%)
2
(7.7%)
0
(0%)
1
(3.8%)
0
(0%)
26
  Offals 0
(0%)
0
(0%)
0
(0%)
1
(100%)
0
(0%)
1
Milk and dairy
products
  155
(11.4%)
306
(22.5%)
338
(24.9%)
525
(38.7%)
34
(2.5%)
1358
  Plant-based
milk
substitutes
19
(22.9%)
43
(51.8%)
4
(4.8%)
17
(20.5%)
0
(0%)
83
  Milk and
yogurt
90
(17.2%)
215
(41%)
186
(35.5%)
33
(6.3%)
0
(0%)
524
  Cheese 34
(6.6%)
29
(5.6%)
75
(14.6%)
366
(71.1%)
11
(2.1%)
515
  Dairy
desserts
9
(9.7%)
13
(14%)
42
(45.2%)
26
(28%)
3
(3.2%)
93
  Ice cream 3
(2.1%)
6
(4.2%)
31(21.7%) 83
(58%)
20
(14%)
143
Fat and
sauces
  21
(2.9%)
45
(6.2%)
205
(28%)
347
(47.5%)
113
(15.5%)
731
  Dressings and
sauces
21
(3.9%)
45
(8.3%)
167
(30.8%)
237
(43.6%)
73
(13.4%)
543
  Fats 0
(0%)
0
(0%)
38
(20.2%)
110
(58.5%)
40
(21.3%)
188
Salty
snacks
  12
(2.8%)
21
(4.9%)
127
(29.7%)
206
(48.2%)
61
(14.3%)
427
  Appetizers 2
(0.9%)
12
5.4%)
64
(29%)
111
(50.2%)
32
(14.5%)
221
  Nuts 6
(6.1%)
6
(6.1%)
22
(22.4%)
50
(51%)
14
(14.3%)
98
  Salty and fatty
products
4
(3.7%)
3
(2.8%)
41
(38%)
45
(41.7%)
15
(13.9%)
108
Sugary
snacks
  17
(0.9%)
61
(3.1%)
166
(8.4%)
633
(32.1%)
1095
(55.5%)
1972
  Biscuits
and cakes
5
(0.6%)
4
(0.5%)
75
(9.2%)
288
(35.5%)
439
(54.1%)
811
  Chocolate
products
0
(0%)
0
(0%)
5
(1.1%)
61
(12.8%)
410
(86.1%)
476
  Sweets 12
(2%)
57
(9.7%)
65
(11.1%)
231
(39.4%)
222
(37.8%)
587
  pastries 0
(0%)
0
(0%)
21
(21.4%)
53
(54.1%)
24
(24.5%)
98
Composite
foods
  78
(12.4%)
179
(28.4%)
227
(36%)
123
(19.5%)
23
(3.7%)
630
  One-dish
meals
76
(16.1%)
157
(33.2%)
161
(34%)
65
(13.7%)
14
(3%)
473
  Pizza pies and quiches 0
(0%)
12
(10.9%)
56
(50.9%)
36
(32.7%)
6
(5.5%)
110
  Sandwiches 2
(4.3%)
10
(21.3%)
10
(21.3%)
22
(46.8%)
3
(6.4%)
47
Beverages   105
(12.1%)
70
(8.1%)
180
(20.8%)
183
(21.2%)
327
(37.8%)
865
  Waters 104
(100%)
0
(0%)
0
(0%)
0
(0%)
0
(0%)
104
  Teas and
herbal teas and
coffees
0
(0%)
5
(12.5%)
2
(5%)
12
(30%)
21
(52.5%)
40
  Fruit juices 1
(0.5%)
26
(12.6%)
144
(69.6%)
30
(14.5%)
6
(2.9%)
207
  Fruit nectars 0
(0%)
0
(0%)
0
(0%)
4
(13.3%)
26
(86.7%)
30
  Artificially sweetened
beverages
0
(0%)
37
(26.8%)
23
(16.7%)
63
(45.7%)
15
(10.9%)
138
  Sweetened
beverages
0
(0%)
2
(0.6%)
11
(3.2%)
74
(21.4%)
259
(74.9%)
346
Sum   1431
(16.8%)
1108
(13%)
1763
(20.8%)
2412
(28.4%)
1779
(20.9%)
8493
Page break

Results for Belgium

For Belgium, the OpenFoodFact table included 30435 foods. From this list, 22415 products could not be affected to a specific food group and were deleted from the list. Then, 800 products were removed because the nutritional informations necessary to the calculation of the NutriScore were missing. 13 products were deleted after additional quality controls. Finally, the OpenFoodFact table used for this document included 7207 foods. The database contained 538 products composed mainly of fruits and vegetables, 892 bread and cereal products, 638 meat, fish and eggs products, 1209 milk and dairy, 676 fats and sauces, 553 composite dishes, 1485 sugary snacks, 417 salty snacks. Overall, the mean FSAm-NSP score was 9.3+/- 8.9 points.

The overall distribution of the FSAm-NSP score is represented in Figure 1.

Figure 1: Overall distribution of the FSAm-NSP score

The distribution of the Nutri-Score in the different food groups is represented in Figures 2, 3 and 4.

Figure 2: Distribution of the FSAm-NSP score for solid foods. Vertical lines represent the cut-offs of the 5-category Nutriscore. The boundary of the box nearest to the left indicates the 25th percentile, the line within the box marks the median, and the boundary of the box furthest from the left indicates the 75th percentile. Whiskers (error bars) left and right of the box indicate the lower limit (25th percentile – 1.5 * (Inter-quartile range) and the upper limit (75th percentile + 1.5 * (Inter-quartile range)). The circles are individual outlier points. *Products containing mainly fruits and vegetables

Figure 3: Distribution of the FSAm-NSP score for solid foods in subgroups containing more than 20 items. Vertical lines represent the cut-offs of the 5-category Nutriscore. The boundary of the box nearest to the left indicates the 25th percentile, the line within the box marks the median, and the boundary of the box furthest from the left indicates the 75th percentile. Whiskers (error bars) left and right of the box indicate the lower limit (25th percentile – 1.5 * (Inter-quartile range) and the upper limit (75th percentile + 1.5 * (Inter-quartile range)). The circles are individual outlier points. ** Fruits based products ; *** Vegetables based products

Figure 4: Distribution of the FSAm-NSP score for beverages. Vertical lines represent the cut-offs of the 5-category Nutriscore. The boundary of the box nearest to the left indicates the 25th percentile, the line within the box marks the median, and the boundary of the box furthest from the left indicates the 75th percentile. Whiskers (error bars) left and right of the box indicate the lower limit (25th percentile – 1.5 * (Inter-quartile range) and the upper limit (75th percentile + 1.5 * (Inter-quartile range)). The circles are individual outlier points. By definition, only water is classified as A.

The distribution of the Nutri-Score within the different food groups is displayed in Table 1.

Table 1: Distribution of the Nutri-Score within the different food groups. ** Fruits based products ; *** Vegetables based products.

    A B C D E Total
Fruits and
vegetables*
  324
(60.2%)
90
(16.7%)
111
(20.6%)
12
(2.2%)
1
(0.2%)
538
  Vegetables
***
207
(77.5%)
27(10.1%) 29(10.9%) 4(1.5%) 0(0%) 267
  Dried fruits 8(12.5%) 22(34.4%) 31(48.4%) 2(3.1%) 1(1.6%) 64
  Fruits** 107(74.8%) 17(11.9%) 13(9.1%) 6(4.2%) 0(0%) 143
  Soups 2(3.1%) 24(37.5%) 38(59.4%) 0(0%) 0(0%) 64
Cereals
and potatoes
  367(41.1%) 159(17.8%) 212(23.8%) 134(15%) 20(2.2%) 892
  Bread 44(23.5%) 50(26.7%) 62(33.2%) 25(13.4%) 6(3.2%) 187
  Cereals 195(59.3%) 58(17.6%) 33(10%) 36(10.9%) 7(2.1%) 329
  Legumes 50(68.5%) 5(6.8%) 9(12.3%) 7(9.6%) 2(2.7%) 73
  Potatoes 22(41.5%) 13(24.5%) 16(30.2%) 1(1.9%) 1(1.9%) 53
  Breakfast
cereals
56(22.4%) 33(13.2%) 92(36.8%) 65(26%) 4(1.6%) 250
Fish Meat Eggs   54(8.5%) 102(16%) 144(22.6%) 224(35.1%) 114(17.9%) 638
  Fish and
seafood
26(11.3%) 71(30.9%) 45(19.6%) 86(37.4%) 2(0.9%) 230
  Meat 18(12.5%) 21(14.6%) 50(34.7%) 47(32.6%) 8(5.6%) 144
  Processed meat 0(0%) 6(2.4%) 47(19%) 90(36.4%) 104(42.1%) 247
  Eggs 10(66.7%) 4(26.7%) 1(6.7%) 0(0%) 0(0%) 15
  Offals 0(0%) 0(0%) 1(50%) 1(50%) 0(0%) 2
Milk and dairy products   118(9.8%) 302(25%) 248(20.5%) 471(39%) 70(5.8%) 1209
  Plant-based milk substitutes 13(16.9%) 47(61%) 0(0%) 17(22.1%) 0(0%) 77
  Milk and
yogurt
81(18%) 216(48.1%) 117(26.1%) 34(7.6%) 1(0.2%) 449
  Cheese 9(1.9%) 10(2.1%) 67(14.3%) 348(74.4%) 34(7.3%) 468
  Dairy desserts 15(13.8%) 23(21.1%) 48(44%) 21(19.3%) 2(1.8%) 109
  Ice cream 0(0%) 6(5.7%) 16(15.1%) 51(48.1%) 33(31.1%) 106
Fat and sauces   6(0.9%) 17(2.5%) 148(21.9%) 335(49.6%) 170(25.1%) 676
  Dressings and sauces 6(1.3%) 15(3.1%) 102(21.3%) 229(47.9%) 126(26.4%) 478
  Fats 0(0%) 2(1%) 46(23.2%) 106(53.5%) 44(22.2%) 198
Salty snacks   6(1.4%) 20(4.8%) 119(28.5%) 224(53.7%) 48(11.5%) 417
  Appetizers 0(0%) 8(3.2%) 76(30.6%) 144(58.1%) 20(8.1%) 248
  Nuts 3(3.7%) 4(4.9%) 15(18.3%) 46(56.1%) 14(17.1%) 82
  Salty and fatty products 3(3.4%) 8(9.2%) 28(32.2%) 34(39.1%) 14(16.1%) 87
Sugary snacks   16(1.1%) 62(4.2%) 129(8.7%) 443(29.8%) 835(56.2%) 1485
  Biscuits and
cakes
3(0.5%) 9(1.4%) 42(6.6%) 168(26.4%) 415(65.1%) 637
  Chocolate products 0(0%) 4(1.3%) 4(1.3%) 56(17.8%) 250(79.6%) 314
  Sweets 12(2.4%) 48(9.7%) 80(16.2%) 197(39.8%) 158(31.9%) 495
  pastries 1(2.6%) 1(2.6%) 3(7.7%) 22(56.4%) 12(30.8%) 39
Composite
foods
  67(12.1%) 176(31.8%) 207(37.4%) 90(16.3%) 13(2.4%) 553
  One-dish
meals
65(14.4%) 160(35.4%) 167(36.9%) 50(11.1%) 10(2.2%) 452
  Pizza pies and quiches 0(0%) 10(15.6%) 23(35.9%) 28(43.8%) 3(4.7%) 64
  Sandwiches 2(5.4%) 6(16.2%) 17(45.9%) 12(32.4%) 0(0%) 37
Beverages   130(16.3%) 68(8.5%) 187(23.4%) 177(22.2%) 237(29.7%) 799
  Waters 130(100%) 0(0%) 0(0%) 0(0%) 0(0%) 130
  Teas and
herbal teas and coffees
0(0%) 0(0%) 0(0%) 24(50%) 24(50%) 48
  Fruit juices 0(0%) 16(8.6%) 140(74.9%) 26(13.9%) 5(2.7%) 187
  Fruit nectars 0(0%) 0(0%) 0(0%) 3(27.3%) 8(72.7%) 11
  Artificially
sweetened
beverages
0(0%) 45(29%) 36(23.2%) 65(41.9%) 9(5.8%) 155
  Sweetened
beverages
0(0%) 7(2.6%) 11(4.1%) 59(22%) 191(71.3%) 268
Sum   1088
(15.1%)
996
(13.8%)
1505
(20.9%)
2110
(29.3%)
1508
(20.9%)
7207
Page break

Results for Italy

For Italy, the OpenFoodFact table included 6490 foods. From this list, 4326 products could not be affected to a specific food group and were deleted from the list. Then, 264 products were removed because the nutritional informations necessary to the calculation of the NutriScore were missing. 1 product was deleted after additional quality controls. Finally, the OpenFoodFact table used for this document included 1899 foods. The database contained 62 products composed mainly of fruits and vegetables, 367 bread and cereal products, 122 meat, fish and eggs products, 419 milk and dairy, 117 fats and sauces, 73 composite dishes, 519 sugary snacks, 85 salty snacks. Overall, the mean FSAm-NSP score was 8.8+/- 8.8 points.

The overall distribution of the FSAm-NSP score is represented in Figure 1.

Figure 1: Overall distribution of the FSAm-NSP score

The distribution of the Nutri-Score in the different food groups is represented in Figures 2, 3 and 4.

Figure 2: Distribution of the FSAm-NSP score for solid foods. Vertical lines represent the cut-offs of the 5-category Nutriscore. The boundary of the box nearest to the left indicates the 25th percentile, the line within the box marks the median, and the boundary of the box furthest from the left indicates the 75th percentile. Whiskers (error bars) left and right of the box indicate the lower limit (25th percentile – 1.5 * (Inter-quartile range) and the upper limit (75th percentile + 1.5 * (Inter-quartile range)). The circles are individual outlier points. *Products containing mainly fruits and vegetables

Figure 3: Distribution of the FSAm-NSP score for solid foods in subgroups containing more than 20 items. Vertical lines represent the cut-offs of the 5-category Nutriscore. The boundary of the box nearest to the left indicates the 25th percentile, the line within the box marks the median, and the boundary of the box furthest from the left indicates the 75th percentile. Whiskers (error bars) left and right of the box indicate the lower limit (25th percentile – 1.5 * (Inter-quartile range) and the upper limit (75th percentile + 1.5 * (Inter-quartile range)). The circles are individual outlier points. ** Fruits based products ; *** Vegetables based products

Figure 4: Distribution of the FSAm-NSP score for beverages. Vertical lines represent the cut-offs of the 5-category Nutriscore. The boundary of the box nearest to the left indicates the 25th percentile, the line within the box marks the median, and the boundary of the box furthest from the left indicates the 75th percentile. Whiskers (error bars) left and right of the box indicate the lower limit (25th percentile – 1.5 * (Inter-quartile range) and the upper limit (75th percentile + 1.5 * (Inter-quartile range)). The circles are individual outlier points. By definition, only water is classified as A.

The distribution of the Nutri-Score within the different food groups is displayed in Table 1.

Table 1: Distribution of the Nutri-Score within the different food groups. ** Fruits based products ; *** Vegetables based products.

    A B C D E Total
Fruits and
vegetables*
  44(71%) 9(14.5%) 9(14.5%) 0(0%) 0(0%) 62
  Vegetables*** 32(94.1%) 1(2.9%) 1(2.9%) 0(0%) 0(0%) 34
  Dried fruits 1(12.5%) 4(50%) 3(37.5%) 0(0%) 0(0%) 8
  Fruits** 10(66.7%) 0(0%) 5(33.3%) 0(0%) 0(0%) 15
  Soups 1(20%) 4(80%) 0(0%) 0(0%) 0(0%) 5
Cereals and
potatoes
  187(51%) 47(12.8%) 56(15.3%) 68(18.5%) 9(2.5%) 367
  Bread 10(14.5%) 9(13%) 17(24.6%) 30(43.5%) 3(4.3%) 69
  Cereals 140(76.1%) 22(12%) 11(6%) 8(4.3%) 3(1.6%) 184
  Legumes 14(87.5%) 1(6.2%) 0(0%) 1(6.2%) 0(0%) 16
  Potatoes 5(45.5%) 4(36.4%) 2(18.2%) 0(0%) 0(0%) 11
  Breakfast
cereals
18(20.7%) 11(12.6%) 26(29.9%) 29(33.3%) 3(3.4%) 87
Fish Meat Eggs   3(2.5%) 26(21.3%) 31(25.4%) 56(45.9%) 6(4.9%) 122
  Fish and
seafood
3(7%) 11(25.6%) 5(11.6%) 24(55.8%) 0(0%) 43
  Meat 0(0%) 2(9.5%) 8(38.1%) 10(47.6%) 1(4.8%) 21
  Processed
meat
0(0%) 3(6.2%) 18(37.5%) 22(45.8%) 5(10.4%) 48
  Eggs 0(0%) 10(100%) 0(0%) 0(0%) 0(0%) 10
Milk and dairy products   56(13.4%) 137(32.7%) 119(28.4%) 92(22%) 15(3.6%) 419
  Plant-based
milk
substitutes
12(22.6%) 37(69.8%) 4(7.5%) 0(0%) 0(0%) 53
  Milk and
yogurt
43(20.8%) 96(46.4%) 67(32.4%) 1(0.5%) 0(0%) 207
  Cheese 1(0.8%) 4(3.2%) 41(32.8%) 72(57.6%) 7(5.6%) 125
  Dairy desserts 0(0%) 0(0%) 1(50%) 1(50%) 0(0%) 2
  Ice cream 0(0%) 0(0%) 6(18.8%) 18(56.2%) 8(25%) 32
Fat and sauces   2(1.7%) 12(10.3%) 12(10.3%) 59(50.4%) 32(27.4%) 117
  Dressings and sauces 2(3.1%) 11(17.2%) 10(15.6%) 21(32.8%) 20(31.2%) 64
  Fats 0(0%) 1(1.9%) 2(3.8%) 38(71.7%) 12(22.6%) 53
Salty snacks   4(4.7%) 1(1.2%) 27(31.8%) 46(54.1%) 7(8.2%) 85
  Appetizers 2(2.9%) 1(1.4%) 20(29%) 39(56.5%) 7(10.1%) 69
  Nuts 2(33.3%) 0(0%) 2(33.3%) 2(33.3%) 0(0%) 6
  Salty and fatty products 0(0%) 0(0%) 5(50%) 5(50%) 0(0%) 10
Sugary snacks   6(1.2%) 9(1.7%) 87(16.8%) 189(36.4%) 228(43.9%) 519
  Biscuits and
cakes
3(1.1%) 3(1.1%) 55(20.7%) 103(38.7%) 102(38.3%) 266
  Chocolate
products
0(0%) 0(0%) 0(0%) 20(23.3%) 66(76.7%) 86
  Sweets 3(2%) 6(4%) 30(20.1%) 60(40.3%) 50(33.6%) 149
  pastries 0(0%) 0(0%) 2(11.1%) 6(33.3%) 10(55.6%) 18
Composite
foods
  6(8.2%) 13(17.8%) 25(34.2%) 26(35.6%) 3(4.1%) 73
  One-dish
meals
3(8.6%) 10(28.6%) 11(31.4%) 11(31.4%) 0(0%) 35
  Pizza pies and quiches 1(2.8%) 3(8.3%) 14(38.9%) 15(41.7%) 3(8.3%) 36
  Sandwiches 2(100%) 0(0%) 0(0%) 0(0%) 0(0%) 2
Beverages   17(12.6%) 7(5.2%) 32(23.7%) 18(13.3%) 61(45.2%) 135
  Waters 17(100%) 0(0%) 0(0%) 0(0%) 0(0%) 17
  Teas and
herbal teas and coffees
0(0%) 1(100%) 0(0%) 0(0%) 0(0%) 1
  Fruit juices 0(0%) 4(10%) 28(70%) 6(15%) 2(5%) 40
  Fruit nectars 0(0%) 0(0%) 0(0%) 1(4%) 24(96%) 25
  Artificially
sweetened
beverages
0(0%) 2(15.4%) 3(23.1%) 8(61.5%) 0(0%) 13
  Sweetened
beverages
0(0%) 0(0%) 1(2.6%) 3(7.7%) 35(89.7%) 39
Sum   325(17.1%) 261(13.7%) 398(21%) 554(29.2%) 361(19%) 1899
Page break

Results for United-Kingdom

For United-Kingdom, the OpenFoodFact table included 11924 foods. From this list, 8051 products could not be affected to a specific food group and were deleted from the list. Then, 811 products were removed because the nutritional informations necessary to the calculation of the NutriScore were missing. 4 products were deleted after additional quality controls. Finally, the OpenFoodFact table used for this document included 3058 foods. The database contained 186 products composed mainly of fruits and vegetables, 346 bread and cereal products, 285 meat, fish and eggs products, 421 milk and dairy, 311 fats and sauces, 271 composite dishes, 805 sugary snacks, 198 salty snacks. Overall, the mean FSAm-NSP score was 8.9+/- 9.2 points.

The overall distribution of the FSAm-NSP score is represented in Figure 1.

Figure 1: Overall distribution of the FSAm-NSP score

The distribution of the Nutri-Score in the different food groups is represented in Figures 2, 3 and 4.

Figure 2: Distribution of the FSAm-NSP score for solid foods. Vertical lines represent the cut-offs of the 5-category Nutriscore. The boundary of the box nearest to the left indicates the 25th percentile, the line within the box marks the median, and the boundary of the box furthest from the left indicates the 75th percentile. Whiskers (error bars) left and right of the box indicate the lower limit (25th percentile – 1.5 * (Inter-quartile range) and the upper limit (75th percentile + 1.5 * (Inter-quartile range)). The circles are individual outlier points. *Products containing mainly fruits and vegetables

Figure 3: Distribution of the FSAm-NSP score for solid foods in subgroups containing more than 20 items. Vertical lines represent the cut-offs of the 5-category Nutriscore. The boundary of the box nearest to the left indicates the 25th percentile, the line within the box marks the median, and the boundary of the box furthest from the left indicates the 75th percentile. Whiskers (error bars) left and right of the box indicate the lower limit (25th percentile – 1.5 * (Inter-quartile range) and the upper limit (75th percentile + 1.5 * (Inter-quartile range)). The circles are individual outlier points. ** Fruits based products ; *** Vegetables based products

Figure 4: Distribution of the FSAm-NSP score for beverages. Vertical lines represent the cut-offs of the 5-category Nutriscore. The boundary of the box nearest to the left indicates the 25th percentile, the line within the box marks the median, and the boundary of the box furthest from the left indicates the 75th percentile. Whiskers (error bars) left and right of the box indicate the lower limit (25th percentile – 1.5 * (Inter-quartile range) and the upper limit (75th percentile + 1.5 * (Inter-quartile range)). The circles are individual outlier points. By definition, only water is classified as A.

The distribution of the Nutri-Score within the different food groups is displayed in Table 1.

Table 1: Distribution of the Nutri-Score within the different food groups. ** Fruits based products ; *** Vegetables based products.

    A B C D E Total
Fruits and
vegetables*
  136(73.1%) 19(10.2%) 26(14%) 5(2.7%) 0(0%) 186
  Vegetables*** 96(91.4%) 6(5.7%) 3(2.9%) 0(0%) 0(0%) 105
  Dried fruits 2(10.5%) 6(31.6%) 11(57.9%) 0(0%) 0(0%) 19
  Fruits** 37(69.8%) 1(1.9%) 10(18.9%) 5(9.4%) 0(0%) 53
  Soups 1(11.1%) 6(66.7%) 2(22.2%) 0(0%) 0(0%) 9
Cereals and
potatoes
  163(47.1%) 69(19.9%) 66(19.1%) 40(11.6%) 8(2.3%) 346
  Bread 31(47.7%) 20(30.8%) 11(16.9%) 3(4.6%) 0(0%) 65
  Cereals 78(56.1%) 33(23.7%) 16(11.5%) 7(5%) 5(3.6%) 139
  Legumes 13(32.5%) 1(2.5%) 9(22.5%) 15(37.5%) 2(5%) 40
  Potatoes 7(46.7%) 5(33.3%) 3(20%) 0(0%) 0(0%) 15
  Breakfast
cereals
34(39.1%) 10(11.5%) 27(31%) 15(17.2%) 1(1.1%) 87
Fish Meat
Eggs
  57(20%) 67(23.5%) 51(17.9%) 80(28.1%) 30(10.5%) 285
  Fish and
seafood
18(21.2%) 31(36.5%) 18(21.2%) 18(21.2%) 0(0%) 85
  Meat 22(20.8%) 28(26.4%) 15(14.2%) 33(31.1%) 8(7.5%) 106
  Processed meat 0(0%) 6(8.6%) 15(21.4%) 27(38.6%) 22(31.4%) 70
  Eggs 17(85%) 2(10%) 1(5%) 0(0%) 0(0%) 20
  Offals 0(0%) 0(0%) 2(50%) 2(50%) 0(0%) 4
Milk and dairy products   67(15.9%) 108(25.7%) 95(22.6%) 139(33%) 12(2.9%) 421
  Plant-based
milk
substitutes
5(19.2%) 10(38.5%) 1(3.8%) 10(38.5%) 0(0%) 26
  Milk and
yogurt
55(22.4%) 94(38.2%) 75(30.5%) 21(8.5%) 1(0.4%) 246
  Cheese 7(6.5%) 0(0%) 7(6.5%) 90(84.1%) 3(2.8%) 107
  Dairy desserts 0(0%) 4(20%) 10(50%) 5(25%) 1(5%) 20
  Ice cream 0(0%) 0(0%) 2(9.1%) 13(59.1%) 7(31.8%) 22
Fat and sauces   3(1%) 16(5.1%) 106(34.1%) 143(46%) 43(13.8%) 311
  Dressings and sauces 3(1.3%) 14(6%) 101(43%) 101(43%) 16(6.8%) 235
  Fats 0(0%) 2(2.6%) 5(6.6%) 42(55.3%) 27(35.5%) 76
Salty snacks   9(4.5%) 17(8.6%) 75(37.9%) 83(41.9%) 14(7.1%) 198
  Appetizers 3(2.6%) 7(6.1%) 37(32.5%) 55(48.2%) 12(10.5%) 114
  Nuts 1(2.8%) 2(5.6%) 17(47.2%) 16(44.4%) 0(0%) 36
  Salty and fatty products 5(10.4%) 8(16.7%) 21(43.8%) 12(25%) 2(4.2%) 48
Sugary snacks   6(0.7%) 14(1.7%) 57(7.1%) 329(40.9%) 399(49.6%) 805
  Biscuits and
cakes
3(0.8%) 2(0.5%) 22(5.8%) 148(38.7%) 207(54.2%) 382
  Chocolate
products
0(0%) 0(0%) 0(0%) 37(22%) 131(78%) 168
  Sweets 3(1.3%) 12(5.1%) 32(13.5%) 130(54.9%) 60(25.3%) 237
  pastries 0(0%) 0(0%) 3(16.7%) 14(77.8%) 1(5.6%) 18
Composite
foods
  88(32.5%) 84(31%) 54(19.9%) 38(14%) 7(2.6%) 271
  One-dish
meals
75(38.5%) 63(32.3%) 40(20.5%) 17(8.7%) 0(0%) 195
  Pizza pies and quiches 0(0%) 7(17.9%) 10(25.6%) 16(41%) 6(15.4%) 39
  Sandwiches 13(35.1%) 14(37.8%) 4(10.8%) 5(13.5%) 1(2.7%) 37
Beverages   40(17%) 23(9.8%) 66(28.1%) 47(20%) 59(25.1%) 235
  Waters 40(100%) 0(0%) 0(0%) 0(0%) 0(0%) 40
  Teas and
herbal teas and coffees
0(0%) 1(16.7%) 0(0%) 4(66.7%) 1(16.7%) 6
  Fruit juices 0(0%) 7(10.9%) 42(65.6%) 12(18.8%) 3(4.7%) 64
  Fruit nectars 0(0%) 0(0%) 1(50%) 0(0%) 1(50%) 2
  Artificially
sweetened
beverages
0(0%) 12(19.4%) 22(35.5%) 20(32.3%) 8(12.9%) 62
  Sweetened
beverages
0(0%) 3(4.9%) 1(1.6%) 11(18%) 46(75.4%) 61
Sum   569(18.6%) 417(13.6%) 596(19.5%) 904(29.6%) 572(18.7%) 3058
Page break

Results for the Netherlands

For the Netherlands, the OpenFoodFact table included 5134 foods. From this list, 3810 products could not be affected to a specific food group and were deleted from the list. Then, 128 products were removed because the nutritional informations necessary to the calculation of the NutriScore were missing. 2 products were deleted after additional quality controls. Finally, the OpenFoodFact table used for this document included 1194 foods. The database contained 69 products composed mainly of fruits and vegetables, 231 bread and cereal products, 46 meat, fish and eggs products, 209 milk and dairy, 105 fats and sauces, 62 composite dishes, 288 sugary snacks, 84 salty snacks. Overall, the mean FSAm-NSP score was 8.5+/- 9.5 points.

The overall distribution of the FSAm-NSP score is represented in Figure 1.

Figure 1: Overall distribution of the FSAm-NSP score

The distribution of the Nutri-Score in the different food groups is represented in Figures 2, 3 and 4.

Figure 2: Distribution of the FSAm-NSP score for solid foods. Vertical lines represent the cut-offs of the 5-category Nutriscore. The boundary of the box nearest to the left indicates the 25th percentile, the line within the box marks the median, and the boundary of the box furthest from the left indicates the 75th percentile. Whiskers (error bars) left and right of the box indicate the lower limit (25th percentile – 1.5 * (Inter-quartile range) and the upper limit (75th percentile + 1.5 * (Inter-quartile range)). The circles are individual outlier points. *Products containing mainly fruits and vegetables

Figure 3: Distribution of the FSAm-NSP score for solid foods in subgroups containing more than 20 items. Vertical lines represent the cut-offs of the 5-category Nutriscore. The boundary of the box nearest to the left indicates the 25th percentile, the line within the box marks the median, and the boundary of the box furthest from the left indicates the 75th percentile. Whiskers (error bars) left and right of the box indicate the lower limit (25th percentile – 1.5 * (Inter-quartile range) and the upper limit (75th percentile + 1.5 * (Inter-quartile range)). The circles are individual outlier points. ** Fruits based products ; *** Vegetables based products

Figure 4: Distribution of the FSAm-NSP score for beverages. Vertical lines represent the cut-offs of the 5-category Nutriscore. The boundary of the box nearest to the left indicates the 25th percentile, the line within the box marks the median, and the boundary of the box furthest from the left indicates the 75th percentile. Whiskers (error bars) left and right of the box indicate the lower limit (25th percentile – 1.5 * (Inter-quartile range) and the upper limit (75th percentile + 1.5 * (Inter-quartile range)). The circles are individual outlier points. By definition, only water is classified as A..

The distribution of the Nutri-Score within the different food groups is displayed in Table 1.

Table 1: Distribution of the Nutri-Score within the different food groups. ** Fruits based products ; *** Vegetables based products.

    A B C D E Total
Fruits and
vegetables*
  44(63.8%) 12(17.4%) 12(17.4%) 1(1.4%) 0(0%) 69
  Vegetables*** 26(81.2%) 6(18.8%) 0(0%) 0(0%) 0(0%) 32
  Dried fruits 0(0%) 3(33.3%) 6(66.7%) 0(0%) 0(0%) 9
  Fruits** 18(81.8%) 1(4.5%) 2(9.1%) 1(4.5%) 0(0%) 22
  Soups 0(0%) 2(33.3%) 4(66.7%) 0(0%) 0(0%) 6
Cereals and
potatoes
  126(54.5%) 29(12.6%) 33(14.3%) 41(17.7%) 2(0.9%) 231
  Bread 13(35.1%) 10(27%) 6(16.2%) 7(18.9%) 1(2.7%) 37
  Cereals 69(70.4%) 9(9.2%) 11(11.2%) 9(9.2%) 0(0%) 98
  Legumes 28(53.8%) 2(3.8%) 3(5.8%) 19(36.5%) 0(0%) 52
  Potatoes 0(0%) 1(50%) 1(50%) 0(0%) 0(0%) 2
  Breakfast
cereals
16(38.1%) 7(16.7%) 12(28.6%) 6(14.3%) 1(2.4%) 42
Fish Meat Eggs   3(6.5%) 9(19.6%) 10(21.7%) 11(23.9%) 13(28.3%) 46
  Fish and
seafood
1(4.3%) 9(39.1%) 9(39.1%) 4(17.4%) 0(0%) 23
  Meat 1(16.7%) 0(0%) 1(16.7%) 4(66.7%) 0(0%) 6
  Processed meat 0(0%) 0(0%) 0(0%) 3(18.8%) 13(81.2%) 16
  Eggs 1(100%) 0(0%) 0(0%) 0(0%) 0(0%) 1
Milk and dairy products   47(22.5%) 79(37.8%) 20(9.6%) 48(23%) 15(7.2%) 209
  Plant-based
milk
substitutes
16(29.6%) 33(61.1%) 0(0%) 5(9.3%) 0(0%) 54
  Milk and
yogurt
27(31.8%) 40(47.1%) 11(12.9%) 6(7.1%) 1(1.2%) 85
  Cheese 3(6.5%) 4(8.7%) 6(13%) 29(63%) 4(8.7%) 46
  Dairy desserts 1(33.3%) 0(0%) 2(66.7%) 0(0%) 0(0%) 3
  Ice cream 0(0%) 2(9.5%) 1(4.8%) 8(38.1%) 10(47.6%) 21
Fat and sauces   7(6.7%) 4(3.8%) 26(24.8%) 57(54.3%) 11(10.5%) 105
  Dressings and sauces 4(6.3%) 3(4.8%) 19(30.2%) 31(49.2%) 6(9.5%) 63
  Fats 3(7.1%) 1(2.4%) 7(16.7%) 26(61.9%) 5(11.9%) 42
Salty snacks   2(2.4%) 1(1.2%) 36(42.9%) 39(46.4%) 6(7.1%) 84
  Appetizers 1(2.5%) 0(0%) 16(40%) 20(50%) 3(7.5%) 40
  Nuts 1(4.8%) 1(4.8%) 6(28.6%) 11(52.4%) 2(9.5%) 21
  Salty and fatty products 0(0%) 0(0%) 14(60.9%) 8(34.8%) 1(4.3%) 23
Sugary snacks   4(1.4%) 8(2.8%) 22(7.6%) 88(30.6%) 166(57.6%) 288
  Biscuits and
cakes
1(1%) 2(1.9%) 12(11.4%) 31(29.5%) 59(56.2%) 105
  Chocolate
products
0(0%) 0(0%) 1(1%) 14(14%) 85(85%) 100
  Sweets 3(3.7%) 6(7.4%) 9(11.1%) 41(50.6%) 22(27.2%) 81
  pastries 0(0%) 0(0%) 0(0%) 2(100%) 0(0%) 2
Composite
foods
  7(11.3%) 12(19.4%) 29(46.8%) 12(19.4%) 2(3.2%) 62
  One-dish
meals
6(13.3%) 10(22.2%) 20(44.4%) 7(15.6%) 2(4.4%) 45
  Pizza pies and quiches 0(0%) 0(0%) 7(63.6%) 4(36.4%) 0(0%) 11
  Sandwiches 1(16.7%) 2(33.3%) 2(33.3%) 1(16.7%) 0(0%) 6
Beverages   18(18%) 7(7%) 25(25%) 26(26%) 24(24%) 100
  Waters 18(100%) 0(0%) 0(0%) 0(0%) 0(0%) 18
  Teas and
herbal teas and coffees
0(0%) 0(0%) 1(8.3%) 9(75%) 2(16.7%) 12
  Fruit juices 0(0%) 5(20%) 16(64%) 3(12%) 1(4%) 25
  Fruit nectars 0(0%) 0(0%) 0(0%) 0(0%) 1(100%) 1
  Artificially
sweetened
beverages
0(0%) 2(22.2%) 3(33.3%) 4(44.4%) 0(0%) 9
  Sweetened
beverages
0(0%) 0(0%) 5(14.3%) 10(28.6%) 20(57.1%) 35
Sum   258
(21.6%)
161
(13.5%)
213
(17.8%)
323
(27.1%)
239
(20%)
1194
Page break

Results for Sweden

For Sweden, the OpenFoodFact table included 2073 foods. From this list, 912 products could not be affected to a specific food group and were deleted from the list. Then, 93 products were removed because the nutritional informations necessary to the calculation of the NutriScore were missing. Finally, the OpenFoodFact table used for this document included 1068 foods. The database contained 47 products composed mainly of fruits and vegetables, 121 bread and cereal products, 82 meat, fish and eggs products, 202 milk and dairy, 95 fats and sauces, 203 composite dishes, 151 sugary snacks, 90 salty snacks. Overall, the mean FSAm-NSP score was 8.3+/- 9 points.

The overall distribution of the FSAm-NSP score is represented in Figure 1.

Figure 1: Overall distribution of the FSAm-NSP score

The distribution of the Nutri-Score in the different food groups is represented in Figures 2, 3 and 4.

Figure 2: Distribution of the FSAm-NSP score for solid foods. Vertical lines represent the cut-offs of the 5-category Nutriscore. The boundary of the box nearest to the left indicates the 25th percentile, the line within the box marks the median, and the boundary of the box furthest from the left indicates the 75th percentile. Whiskers (error bars) left and right of the box indicate the lower limit (25th percentile – 1.5 * (Inter-quartile range) and the upper limit (75th percentile + 1.5 * (Inter-quartile range)). The circles are individual outlier points. *Products containing mainly fruits and vegetables

Figure 3: Distribution of the FSAm-NSP score for solid foods in subgroups containing more than 20 items. Vertical lines represent the cut-offs of the 5-category Nutriscore. The boundary of the box nearest to the left indicates the 25th percentile, the line within the box marks the median, and the boundary of the box furthest from the left indicates the 75th percentile. Whiskers (error bars) left and right of the box indicate the lower limit (25th percentile – 1.5 * (Inter-quartile range) and the upper limit (75th percentile + 1.5 * (Inter-quartile range)). The circles are individual outlier points. ** Fruits based products ; *** Vegetables based products

The distribution of the Nutri-Score within the different food groups is displayed in Table 1.

Table 1: Distribution of the Nutri-Score within the different food groups. ** Fruits based products ; *** Vegetables based products.

    A B C D E Total
Fruits and
vegetables*
  23(48.9%) 7(14.9%) 17(36.2%) 0(0%) 0(0%) 47
  Vegetables*** 20(66.7%) 2(6.7%) 8(26.7%) 0(0%) 0(0%) 30
  Dried fruits 0(0%) 3(60%) 2(40%) 0(0%) 0(0%) 5
  Fruits** 2(33.3%) 0(0%) 4(66.7%) 0(0%) 0(0%) 6
  Soups 1(16.7%) 2(33.3%) 3(50%) 0(0%) 0(0%) 6
Cereals and
potatoes
  56(46.3%) 28(23.1%) 12(9.9%) 16(13.2%) 9(7.4%) 121
  Bread 14(45.2%) 9(29%) 4(12.9%) 4(12.9%) 0(0%) 31
  Cereals 27(49.1%) 10(18.2%) 3(5.5%) 7(12.7%) 8(14.5%) 55
  Legumes 4(44.4%) 1(11.1%) 1(11.1%) 3(33.3%) 0(0%) 9
  Potatoes 4(57.1%) 2(28.6%) 1(14.3%) 0(0%) 0(0%) 7
  Breakfast
cereals
7(36.8%) 6(31.6%) 3(15.8%) 2(10.5%) 1(5.3%) 19
Fish Meat Eggs   17(20.7%) 16(19.5%) 15(18.3%) 22(26.8%) 12(14.6%) 82
  Fish and
seafood
7(25%) 11(39.3%) 6(21.4%) 4(14.3%) 0(0%) 28
  Meat 3(9.4%) 5(15.6%) 9(28.1%) 8(25%) 7(21.9%) 32
  Processed meat 0(0%) 0(0%) 0(0%) 10(66.7%) 5(33.3%) 15
  Eggs 7(100%) 0(0%) 0(0%) 0(0%) 0(0%) 7
Milk and dairy products   61(30.2%) 34(16.8%) 36(17.8%) 57(28.2%) 14(6.9%) 202
  Plant-based
milk
substitutes
0(0%) 1(50%) 0(0%) 1(50%) 0(0%) 2
  Milk and
yogurt
43(50.6%) 20(23.5%) 13(15.3%) 9(10.6%) 0(0%) 85
  Cheese 14(17.9%) 12(15.4%) 15(19.2%) 30(38.5%) 7(9%) 78
  Dairy desserts 3(37.5%) 0(0%) 4(50%) 1(12.5%) 0(0%) 8
  Ice cream 1(3.4%) 1(3.4%) 4(13.8%) 16(55.2%) 7(24.1%) 29
Fat and sauces   1(1.1%) 3(3.2%) 21(22.1%) 54(56.8%) 16(16.8%) 95
  Dressings and sauces 1(1.3%) 3(3.8%) 20(25.3%) 43(54.4%) 12(15.2%) 79
  Fats 0(0%) 0(0%) 1(6.2%) 11(68.8%) 4(25%) 16
Salty snacks   4(4.4%) 2(2.2%) 12(13.3%) 66(73.3%) 6(6.7%) 90
  Appetizers 3(4.6%) 0(0%) 6(9.2%) 53(81.5%) 3(4.6%) 65
  Nuts 0(0%) 1(6.7%) 5(33.3%) 7(46.7%) 2(13.3%) 15
  Salty and fatty products 1(10%) 1(10%) 1(10%) 6(60%) 1(10%) 10
Sugary snacks   3(2%) 6(4%) 3(2%) 43(28.5%) 96(63.6%) 151
  Biscuits and
cakes
1(2.2%) 0(0%) 0(0%) 11(23.9%) 34(73.9%) 46
  Chocolate
products
0(0%) 0(0%) 0(0%) 8(13.3%) 52(86.7%) 60
  Sweets 2(4.4%) 6(13.3%) 3(6.7%) 24(53.3%) 10(22.2%) 45
Composite
foods
  22(10.8%) 56(27.6%) 103(50.7%) 22(10.8%) 0(0%) 203
  One-dish
meals
21(13.7%) 50(32.7%) 72(47.1%) 10(6.5%) 0(0%) 153
  Pizza pies and quiches 1(2.1%) 6(12.8%) 29(61.7%) 11(23.4%) 0(0%) 47
  Sandwiches 0(0%) 0(0%) 2(66.7%) 1(33.3%) 0(0%) 3
Beverages   7(9.1%) 10(13%) 11(14.3%) 8(10.4%) 41(53.2%) 77
  Waters 7(100%) 0(0%) 0(0%) 0(0%) 0(0%) 7
  Teas and
herbal teas and coffees
0(0%) 0(0%) 0(0%) 0(0%) 1(100%) 1
  Fruit juices 0(0%) 4(28.6%) 8(57.1%) 1(7.1%) 1(7.1%) 14
  Fruit nectars 0(0%) 0(0%) 0(0%) 0(0%) 1(100%) 1
  Artificially
sweetened
beverages
0(0%) 5(45.5%) 3(27.3%) 3(27.3%) 0(0%) 11
  Sweetened
beverages
0(0%) 1(2.3%) 0(0%) 4(9.3%) 38(88.4%) 43
Sum   194
(18.2%)
162
(15.2%)
230
(21.5%)
288
(27%)
194
(18.2%)
1068
Page break

Conclusion

Overall, the distribution of the FSAm-NSP score displayed a high variability in the 7 countries, confirming its validity for use in the 5-category label Nutri-Score in different sociocultural contexts. Moreover, the distribution in the FSAm-NSP score showed a high consistency between the classification and dietary recommendations: overall, products composed mainly of fruits and vegetables, bread and cereals scored consistently more favorably than sugary or salty snacks. Composite dishes displayed a very large distribution, highlighting the variability of the products in this specific category.

The classification of the different food groups in the Nutri-Score displayed a high consistency with nutritional recommendations: the majority of products containing mainly fruits and vegetables were classified as A or B , while a majority of sugary snacks were classified as D or E. This variability was also displayed within food groups: in the bread and cereals group, legumes + pasta and rice were consistently better classified than breakfast cereals; in dairy, milk and yogurt were better classified than cheese.

Finally, in beverages, while a majority of fruit juices were classified as C, soft drinks were classified as E, consistently with nutritional recommendations (onlu water is in A).

Overall, the discriminating power of the Nutri-Score (number of categories in the Nutri-Score available for each food group) was high, as foods were classified in more than 3 categories of the Nutri-Score, both for food groups and for subgroups of foods.

Therefore, overall, the Nutri-Score displays a high consistency with nutritional recommendations, and allows consumers to graps the very high variability in the nutritional composition of foods. The discriminating power of the Nutri-Score can be used to help consumers making healthier choices at the point of purchases, by displaying with at-a-glance labelling the nutritional quality of products.

Page break

References

  1. Julia C, Ducrot P, Peneau S et al. Discriminating nutritional quality of foods using the 5-Color nutrition label in the French food market: consistency with nutritional recommendations. Nutr J. 2015;14:100.
  2. Szabo de Edelenyi F, Egnell M, Galan P, Druesne-Pecollo N, Hercberg S and Julia C. Ability of the Nutri-Score front-of-pack nutrition label to discriminate the nutritional quality of foods in the German food market and consistency with nutritional recommendations. Arch Public Health. 2019;77:28.
  3. Rayner M, Scarborough P, Stockley L, and Boxer A. Nutrient profiles: development of Final model. Final Report . Available from: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/266447771_Nutrient_profiles_Development_of_Final_Model_Final_Report.
  4. Rayner M, Scarborough P, and Stockley L. Nutrient profiles: Applicability of Currently Proposed Model for Uses in Relation to Promotion of Foods in Children Aged 5-10 and Adults. [Internet]. Available from: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/267952402_Nutrient_profiles_Applicability_of_currently_proposed_model_for_uses_in_relation_to_promotion_of_food_to_children_aged_5-10_and_adults.
  5. Rayner M, Scarborough P, and Lobstein T. The UK Ofcom Nutrient Profiling Model – Defining ‘healthy’ and ‘unhealthy’ food and drinks for TV advertising to children. [Internet] Available from: https://www.ndph.ox.ac.uk/cpnp/files/about/uk-ofcom-nutrient-profile-model.pdf.
  6. ANSES. Evaluation de la faisabilité du calcul d’un score nutritionnel tel qu’élaboré par Rayner et al. Rapport d’appui scientifique et technique.ANSES :Maison Alfort. Available from: https://www.anses.fr/fr/system/files/DER2014sa0099Ra.pdf.
  7. Haut Conseil de la Santé Publique. Avis relatif à l’information sur la qualité nutritionnelle des produits alimentaires. Paris :HCSP. Availablefrom: http://www.hcsp.fr/Explore.cgi/avisrapportsdomaine?clefr=519.

Incompréhensions et fake-news concernant Nutri-Score. Comment essayer de déstabiliser un outil de santé publique qui dérange ?

Serge Hercberg (1,2), Pilar Galan (1), Manon Egnell (1), Chantal Julia (1,2)

1 Université Paris 13, Equipe de Recherche en Epidémiologie Nutritionnelle (EREN), Centre d’Epidémiologie et Biostatistiques Sorbonne Paris Cité (CRESS), Inserm U1153, Inra U1125, Cnam, COMUE Sorbonne-Paris-Cité, F-93017 Bobigny

2 Département de Santé Publique, Hôpital Avicenne (AP-HP), F-93017 Bobigny

Depuis quelques mois, circulent sur les réseaux sociaux, dans divers médias et parfois même dans la bouche de personnalités politiques de premier plan, un certain nombre d’opinions négatives et d’informations trompeuses à propos du Nutri-Score, le logo d’information nutritionnelle destiné à être apposé en face avant des emballages des aliments adopté officiellement par la France en 2017, et plus récemment par la Belgique et l’Espagne. Ce phénomène s’est particulièrement accentué ces dernières semaines, vraisemblablement en rapport avec les débats très médiatisés qui ont lieu actuellement dans plusieurs pays européens autour du choix de leur logo nutritionnel, et du fait aussi des discussions qui ont lieu au sein des instances de la Communauté Européenne à Bruxelles.

Dans ce cadre bouillonnant, les manœuvres visant à décrédibiliser le Nutri-Score pour éviter son adoption se multiplient alors que ce dernier est plébiscité par de multiples associations de consommateurs en Europe ! Fort d’un dossier scientifique convaincant regroupant plus d’une trentaine de publications internationales validant d’une part son algorithme sous-jacent et son format graphique et démontrant, d’autre part, son efficacité et sa supériorité par rapport aux autres logos sur plusieurs dimensions du comportement des consommateurs, le Nutri-Score est refusé avec force par certains groupes de pression (association des industriels agro-alimentaires FEVIA en Belgique, BLL en Allemagne, Coldiretti en Italie…). Bien que certains industriels et distributeurs en France, en Belgique, en Espagne, mais aussi en Allemagne, en Autriche, au Portugal, en Suisse, en Slovénie,… ont choisi d’afficher sur leurs produits le Nutri-Score, il persiste encore des oppositions très fortes de certaines grandes multinationales agro-alimentaires qui ne souhaitent pas utiliser le Nutri-Score. Celles-ci ont établi des stratégies pour tenter de le torpiller, en proposant, par exemple, des alternatives de logos qu’ils ont développés et qui leurs sont plus favorables (ENL au niveau européen, cercles du BLL en Allemagne, les batteries en Italie,…). Dans ce sens, les fausses informations (« fake news ») visant le Nutri-Score font, sans aucun doute, le jeu de ces multinationales qui souhaitent décrédibiliser le Nutri-Score. Elles sont également le fait ou sont relayées par toutes sortes de « gourous » ou de simples internautes qui expriment non pas une vision de santé publique étayée par un travail scientifique mais de simples opinions personnelles qui, au travers de quelques exemples montés en épingle visent à décrédibiliser l’ensemble du système. Les fausses informations sur le Nutri-Score qui circulent actuellement sur les réseaux sociaux et dans certains médias se différencient totalement des critiques légitimes qui font partie du débat scientifique utile (notamment sur les limites du système), tant dans leurs objectifs que dans leur forme. Les fake news se caractérisent par le fait que l’information qu’elles véhiculent est trompeuse, et ne cherchent qu’à troubler les esprits. Elles se limitent le plus souvent à la juxtaposition d’éléments qui peuvent être juste pour chacun d’entre eux mais dont la mise en scène peut contribuer à une confusion ou semer le doute chez ceux qui n’ont pas le recul ou suffisamment de connaissances sur le Nutri-Score, sur ses objectifs et la manière dont il se calcule et s’utilise.

Le plus souvent, les fake news montent en épingle un seul exemple du système, sorti de tout contexte, en l’utilisant pour décrédibiliser l’ensemble. Elles circulent de ce fait sous la même forme (message ou support iconographique), le plus souvent au travers d’une image « parlante » présentée sous une forme pseudo-scientifique. La même image est souvent accompagnée de commentaires méprisants voire injurieux. Les fake-news sont souvent mises en ligne ou relayées par des émetteurs « anonymes » ou par des particuliers qui s’appuyant sur la même information (souvent la même image) donnent leur avis personnel (dans certains cas vraisemblablement trompés eux-mêmes par l’information ou insuffisamment informés pour reconnaitre la fake news). Ce qui est spectaculaire c’est que ces désinformations sortent des réseaux sociaux et sont repris comme de éléments scientifiques par certains médias (parfois importants) et par tous ceux qui ont intérêt à s’en servir (lobbys, scientifiques ayant des liens d’intérêt avec des opérateurs économiques, personnalités politiques, voire ministres…).

En fait le lancement d’une fausse information sur le Nutri-Score et le fait qu’elle soit relayée par différents émetteurs impliquent différents mécanismes :

1. la méconnaissance ou la dénégation de ce que l’on peut attendre du Nutri-Score (ou d’ailleurs de tout autre logo nutritionnel). Ainsi, elles n’intègrent manifestement pas, soit volontairement ou non, le principe, l’objectif, les contraintes et le périmètre d’action d’un logo nutritionnel, ni l’ensemble des données scientifiques qui valident son algorithme de calcul ou son format graphique,

2. la reprise d’exemples de comparaisons du Nutri-Score portant toujours sur les mêmes aliments (en nombre très limité), rapprochés et mis en scène dans le but de donner l’impression que le Nutri-Score classerait de façon absurde la qualité nutritionnelle ou la valeur santé des aliments, et donc induirait en erreur les consommateurs… Il est intéressant de noter que les exemples utilisés s’appuient toujours sur les mêmes aliments de marque (moins d’une quinzaine d’aliments de marques sachant qu’au total il en existe plus de 200 000 pour lesquels il est possible de calculer le Nutri-Score) et qui se veulent frapper les esprits par leur image dans la population (aliments traditionnels réputés favorables à la santé, aliments industriels réputés défavorables,…) et par la comparaison binaire (bien ou mal classés). A aucun moment n’est d’ailleurs fait état par les détracteurs, du fait que Nutri-Score ne leur pose pas de problème pour 99 % des autres aliments qui ne font pas l’objet d’attaques de leur part ! Ci-dessous sont présentés différentes fake-news qui sont apparus ces derniers mois sur les réseaux sociaux et pour lesquelles nous expliquons leur manque de sérieux. Pour des raisons d’homogénéité nous avons traduits en français les verbatims circulant dans les réseaux sociaux ou dans la presse en espagnol, anglais, flamand, italien ou directement en français.

  • 1. Exemple de fake-news reposant sur une réelle incompréhension de la finalité des logos nutritionnels

« Le Nutri-Score n’a aucun intérêt et est trompeur pour le consommateur, la preuve : certains aliments ultra-transformés contenant des additifs ou des pesticides sont bien classés ! »

Ce type de critiques porte sur le fait que le Nutri-Score n’intègre pas les additifs, le degré de transformation, ou les pesticides. Ce choix est pleinement assumé pour Nutri-Score comme pour tous les autres logos-nutritionnels (pour plus de détail voir article dans The Conversation : https://theconversation.com/le-nutriscore-mesure-la-qualite-nutritionnelle-des-aliments-et-cest-deja-beaucoup-99234), et est lié à l’impossibilité, étant donné les connaissances scientifiques actuelles, de développer un indicateur synthétique qui couvrirait l’ensemble de ces dimensions. Le Nutri-Score est un système d’information nutritionnelle, qui a été démontré comme très utile pour aider les consommateurs à orienter leurs choix vers des aliments de meilleure qualité nutritionnelle, mais en aucun cas il n’a la prétention d’être un système d’information sur la dimension globale ‘santé’ des aliments couvrant, en plus de la dimension nutritionnelle, les dimensions sanitaires et environnementales.

Ce type de critiques porte sur le fait que le Nutri-Score n’intègre pas les additifs, le degré de transformation, ou les pesticides. Ce choix est pleinement assumé pour Nutri-Score comme pour tous les autres logos-nutritionnels (pour plus de détail voir article dans The Conversation : https://theconversation.com/le-nutriscore-mesure-la-qualite-nutritionnelle-des-aliments-et-cest-deja-beaucoup-99234), et est lié à l’impossibilité, étant donné les connaissances scientifiques actuelles, de développer un indicateur synthétique qui couvrirait l’ensemble de ces dimensions. Le Nutri-Score est un système d’information nutritionnelle, qui a été démontré comme très utile pour aider les consommateurs à orienter leurs choix vers des aliments de meilleure qualité nutritionnelle, mais en aucun cas il n’a la prétention d’être un système d’information sur la dimension globale ‘santé’ des aliments couvrant, en plus de la dimension nutritionnelle, les dimensions sanitaires et environnementales.

Synthétiser l’ensemble des dimensions santé des aliments au travers d’un indicateurs unique et fiable, qui prédirait globalement le risque pour la santé serait, à l’évidence, le rêve de tout acteur de Nutrition de Santé Publique dans l’intérêt des consommateurs. Mais ce n’est pas par hasard et surement pas par incompétence, si aucune équipe de recherche ou aucune structure de santé publique dans le monde, ni aucun comité d’experts indépendants nationaux ou internationaux, ni l’OMS n’aient pu concevoir un tel indicateur synthétique. Ceci peut s’expliquer par deux types de raisons :
1)  D’abord les niveaux de connaissances  et le degré de certitude concernant les liens avec la santé diffèrent selon la dimension considérée pour les aliments. L’accumulation de très nombreux travaux épidémiologiques, cliniques et expérimentaux permettent de considérer qu’il existe pour certains éléments nutritionnels (nutriments/aliments) un niveau de preuve documenté et solide sur leur conséquence sur le risque de maladies chroniques allant de « probable » à « convaincant » dans les classifications internationales. Pour les autres dimensions notamment celles se référant aux nombreux additifs, composés néo-formés ou contaminants (pesticides, antibiotiques, perturbateurs endocriniens), il existe certes des hypothèses sur la santé, mais avec des niveaux de preuves très différents (notamment en termes d’études chez l’homme).
2) Une raison découlant de la précédente, il est actuellement impossible de pondérer la contribution relative de chacune des dimensions d’un aliment sur le risque pour la santé, pour aboutir à  une note synthétique qui idéalement serait prédictive d’un niveau de risque global. Certaines applications le proposent, mais elles ne reposent sur aucune base scientifique valide. Les questions méthodologiques sont nombreuses et encore non résolues : mesure précise du risque  attribuable à chacune des dimensions, à chacun des différents composants potentiellement incriminés, effet cocktail potentiel, etc.  De fait, calculer un index unique pour caractériser la qualité sanitaire globale d’un aliment, qui pourrait in fine aboutir à un jugement dans l’absolu (excellent, bon, médiocre,…) ne repose pas sur des bases  scientifiques suffisamment solides et présente donc un caractère assez arbitraire.
3) Enfin, en ce qui concerne les additifs et les pesticides, en cas de preuve d’un risque pour la santé, la réponse à apporter d’un point de vue de santé publique n’est pas l’information du consommateur au travers d’un logo, mais bien le retrait de l’élément en question de la chaîne alimentaire, selon un principe de gestion du risque sanitaire. C’est d’ailleurs le cas aujourd’hui pour l’additif controversé E171, pour lequel un retrait a été annoncé par les autorités françaises.

Cela n’empêche en rien, dans le cadre d’une politique nutritionnelle de santé publique efficace, de recommander à la population de choisir des aliments affichant le meilleur Nutri-Score possible, sans ou avec la plus courte liste possible d’additifs (dans la liste des ingrédients) et de privilégier les aliments bruts et, si possible, Bio (avec un logo certifiant).

2. Un exemple de fake-news reposant sur des pseudos contradictions dans la capacité du Nutri-Score à classer les aliments en fonction de leurs qualités nutritionnelles

« Le Nutri-Score est faux, la preuve : les frites qui ne sont pas bonnes pour la santé sont mieux classées que les sardines qui contiennent plein de bonnes choses ; ou l’huile d’olive est moins bien classées que le Coca-Cola zéro… ! »

Il faut garder à l’esprit que la finalité d’un logo nutritionnel comme Nutri-Score n’est pas de classer les aliments en « aliments sains » ou « aliments non sains », en valeur absolue, comme le ferait un logo binaire (bien vs mal). Une telle finalité pour un logo nutritionnel resterait totalement discutable car cette propriété est liée à la quantité consommée de l’aliment et la fréquence de sa consommation, mais également à l’équilibre alimentaire global des individus (l’équilibre nutritionnel ne se faisant pas sur la consommation d’une prise alimentaire, ni même sur un repas ou sur un jour…). Ces notions complexes ne peuvent, bien sûr, être résumées par un logo nutritionnel attribué à un produit spécifique d’une marque donnée…

Non, la finalité du Nutri-Score est de fournir aux consommateurs une information, en valeur relative qui leur permet, en un simple coup d’œil, de pouvoir comparer la qualité nutritionnelle des aliments, ce qui est déjà très important pour orienter leurs choix au moment de l’acte d’achat. Mais cette comparaison n’a d’intérêt que si elle est pertinente, notamment si elle porte sur des aliments  que le consommateur est confronté à comparer dans la vraie vie (au moment de son acte d’achat ou de sa consommation). Par ailleurs, par définition,  le Nutri-Score n’invente rien, il ne donne pas un blanc-seing sur la valeur santé dans l’absolu de l’aliment. Il ne  fait que retranscrire sous forme synthétique les éléments de composition nutritionnelle qui figurent sur l’étiquette nutritionnelle présente à l’arrière de l’emballage.

Et au contraire, les fake-news vont essayer de détourner l’intérêt du Nutri-Score en mettant en avant des pseudo-contradictions à partir de comparaisons qui n’ont pas de sens réel… 
Voici une des images qui circule le plus souvent sur les réseaux sociaux largement reprise par des internautes, certains médias, des groupes de pression et des politiques

FAKE NEWS

Le principe de cette image (reprise de très nombreuses fois) est d’essayer de caricaturer le Nutri-Score laissant entendre que certaines catégories de produits industriels seraient classées comme « bonnes pour la santé » (« healthy foods ») et mieux classés que des aliments « traditionnels » qui seraient eux considérés comme « non favorables pour la santé » (« unhealthy foods »).

Le Nutri-Score permet de comparer la qualité nutritionnelle des aliments mais à condition que ces comparaisons soient pertinentes et utiles aux consommateurs pour orienter leurs choix. Là encore il est bon de rappeler que Nutri-Score permet de comparer la qualité nutritionnelle :
1) d’aliments appartenant à la même catégorie, par exemple dans la famille des céréales petit déjeuner comparer des mueslis versus des céréales chocolatées, versus des céréales chocolatées et fourrées; comparer des biscuits secs vs des biscuits aux fruits vs des biscuits chocolatés ; ou bien des lasagnes à la viande, à celle au saumon, aux épinards ; ou encore les différents plats préparés à base de pates ; les différents types de pizzas; ou différents types de boissons (eau, jus de fruits, boissons à base de fruits, sodas,…). Dans chacune de ces catégories les Nutri-Score vont varier de A à E, ce qui fournit une information utile pour les consommateurs pour leurs choix,
2) d’un même type d’aliment proposé par des marques différentes (par ex: comparer des céréales chocolatées et fourrées d’une marque par rapport à son « équivalent » d’une autre marque ou des biscuits chocolatés de différentes marques). Là encore, les Nutri-Score peuvent varier de A à E, ce qui est également une information utile pour aider les consommateurs à reconnaitre les aliments de meilleure qualité nutritionnelle,

3) d’aliments appartenant à des familles différentes à conditions qu’il y ait une réelle pertinence dans leurs conditions d’usage ou de consommation (et qui sont souvent proches dans les rayons de supermarchés) : des yaourts par rapport à des crèmes desserts ; des céréales petit déjeuner par rapport à des biscuits, du pain ou des viennoiseries industrielles…

Mais quel est le sens, comme le fait la fake news, de comparer des frites à du roquefort, des céréales petit-déjeuner à des sardines ou l’huile d’olive au Coca Cola Zero ? Est-ce que la question se pose réellement de cette façon pour les consommateurs au moment de leur acte d’achat ou de leur consommation alimentaire ? Il est très peu probable que le consommateur envisage a priori de consommer des sardines pour son petit-déjeuner, ni d’assaisonner sa salade avec du Coca-Cola ou de se rafraîchir avec de l’huile d’olive… En réalité, le consommateur a besoin de pouvoir comparer la qualité nutritionnelle des aliments qui ont une pertinence à se substituer dans sa consommation. S’il souhaite choisir les éléments de son petit déjeuner, il est important qu’il puisse comparer des aliments de catégories différentes mais consommées à cette occasion, par exemple du pain de mie, des viennoiseries, des céréales petit-déjeuner ou des biscuits. Et bien sûr avoir accès à la transparence sur la qualité nutritionnelle au sein des grandes catégories ou en fonction des marques, pour pouvoir ainsi comparer différentes céréales petit-déjeuner entre elles, ou les différentes viennoiseries industrielles ou les pains de mie en fonction des marques…
Dans ce contexte, le Nutri-Score fonctionne parfaitement bien comme le démontre les exemples ci-dessous.
Par exemple : différents aliments appartenant à des catégories différentes mais consommés au petit-déjeuner

Dans cet exemple qui ne reprend que quelques-uns des multiples aliments concernés, on se rend compte d’un coup d’œil que parmi les options pour le petit déjeuner, lorsque l’on compare plusieurs catégories d’aliments, certaines sont plus favorables que d’autres : les pains complets ou certains mueslis sont mieux classés que des biscuits ou des viennoiseries. De plus selon le type de pain (complet ou non), le type de biscuits ou de céréales petit déjeuner il peut exister des variations importantes de qualité nutritionnelle. Par exemple à l’intérieur de la catégorie des céréales petit-déjeuner, il existe une très grande variabilité de qualité nutritionnelle avec des Nutri-Score allant de A à E selon le type de céréales (il en est de même pour des céréales équivalentes  mais de marques différentes):

Il en est de même pour la variabilité de la qualité nutritionnelle des crèmes desserts, qui, sans logo nutritionnel, n’est pas évidente à évaluer pour les consommateurs, mais dont les différences apparaissent de façon très évidente avec l’affichage du Nutri-Score, qui peut aller de A à E selon les produits :

Ce type de fake-news cherche à donner l’impression que le Nutri-Score n’est pas cohérent en terme de classification nutritionnelle des aliments en comparant des aliments qui n’ont pas de raison d’être comparés entre eux tout en omettant l’intérêt principal du Nutri-Score pour le consommateur, à savoir, comparer des aliments dans des conditions pertinente. L’autre élément de tromperie sous-jacent à la fake-news repose sur le fait de jouer sur des stéréotypes en termes de croyance ou de perception des aliments.

Pour les sardines, largement utilisées pour mettre en cause l’intérêt du Nutri-Score (au travers toujours de la même image), si certaines marques sont réellement classées en D, d’autres sardines en boite vont aller de A à D selon leur composition nutritionnelle , il n’est donc pas honnête de ne laisser entendre que les sardines sont systématiquement placées en D par le Nutri-Score…

L’image des frites (souvent liée à celle des fast-foods) est dans la croyance populaire plutôt perçue comme négative sur le plan nutritionnel, alors que celle d’aliments « traditionnels » comme le roquefort, le jambon Serrano ou les sardines (tout comme le saumon fumé) bénéficient d’une perception plutôt favorable. Pourtant il suffit de regarder l’étiquette de l’aliment pour se rendre compte de la réalité de la composition nutritionnelle. Il est tout à fait normal que le roquefort ou le jambon Serrano soient classées E compte-tenu de leur richesse en graisses saturées et en sel. De même que le saumon fumé soit classé  D, largement repris comme une critique du Nutri-Score, est tout à fait « normal » compte-tenu de sa richesse en sel (2,5 à 3,5 g de sel pour 100g), à la différence du saumon frais qui lui est classé A, ce qui n’est jamais indiqué dans les messages mettant en cause la classification du saumon fumé par Nutri-Score.
Là encore il existe de très grandes différences de qualité nutritionnelle au sein des catégories d’aliments (différents fromages, différents jambons,…) ou pour un même aliment selon la préparation et la marque. Si le Roquefort est toujours classé en E (il contient entre 3 et 4 g de sel/100g et est riche en acides gras saturés), la majorité des fromages sont classés en D et certains en C (comme par exemple la mozzarella). Même pour les jambons équivalents, par exemple le jambon Serrano peut être E ou D, et d’autres types de jambon se classent en D ou C.

 

Problèmes spécifiques posés par les frites

Les remarques faites dans les fake news sur les frites touchent à la fois à l’irrationnel (l’image négative des frites rattachée aux fast-foods) et là, encore à l’incompréhension de comment s’établit un logo nutritionnel et quel peut être son rôle. En effet, par définition, le Nutri-Score (comme tous les autres logos nutritionnels) n’est qu’une traduction des valeurs nutritionnelles déclarées à l’arrière du paquet, qui se réfère aux aliments tels que vendus.  Il est en effet demandé au fabricant la transparence sur le produit qui est mis sur le marché, mais ce dernier ne peut tenir compte et/ou anticiper la variabilité des modes de préparation, d’utilisation ou de consommation pour son produit.
Pour le Nutri-Score, seuls les aliments qui nécessitent une reconstitution spécifique, selon une recette standardisée (purée en flocons, préparations sèches pour gâteaux), bénéficient d’un Nutri-Score calculé sur la base de la recette standardisée.

En revanche, pour les frites surgelées plusieurs modes de cuisson sont possibles, et l’utilisation d’une recette standardisée dans ce cas serait réductrice par rapport aux modes de consommation constatés dans la population. La cuisson au four des frites pré-cuites surgelées (le plus souvent classée B par Nutri-Score) n’a pas d’impact sur la composition  nutritionnelle et le Nutri-Score n’est pas modifié dans ce cas après cuisson (il reste B). Par contre, les frites surgelées (non pré-cuites) classées le plus souvent A par le Nutri-Score (ce sont simplement des pommes de terre épluchées et coupées), l’information du mode de cuisson est donnée sur les emballages et recommande une cuisson en auto-cuiseur. Dans ces conditions, le Nutri-Score  passera, selon les huiles de cuisson (plus ou moins riches en acides gras saturés) à B ou au maximum à C. L’ajout de sel par la suite peut lui aussi impacter la note, mais ne peut raisonnablement pas être anticipé lors de l’achat du produit.

Ces éléments montrent à la fois l’intérêt du Nutri-Score qui permet d’éclairer les consommateurs sur la réalité de la composition nutritionnelle et de lutter contre certains stéréotypes ou idées reçues : par exemple dans le cas des frites largement utilisées dans les fake news, elles ont sur le plan nutritionnel une composition nutritionnelle plutôt favorable pour celles à cuire au four et même celles surgelées cuites en friteuse restent correcte sur le plan nutritionnel (classées au maximum C).
Il n’en demeure pas moins qu’il apparait nécessaire dans le cadre exclusif des aliments ne pouvant être consommés tels qu’achetés (telles que les frites surgelées non pré-cuites), et pour lesquels est donné sur l’emballage un mode de cuisson spécifique et détaillé susceptibles d’impacter le Nutri-Score, que le fabriquant alerte les consommateurs de la modification induite sur le Nutri-Score en donnant 1) le Nutri-Score du produit tel que vendu (correspondant aux éléments qui sont sur l’étiquetage nutritionnel) et 2) une mention sur le score final, en donnant la lettre du Nutri-Score obtenue par le produit après cuisson selon le mode recommandé sur l’emballage (pour les frites la modification aboutit à passer à une classe supérieure du Nutri-Score après passage en friteuse).

Au total,

Il apparait donc clairement, contrairement à ce que véhiculent les fake news,que  le Nutri-Score permet de différencier finement et facilement d’un simple coup d’œil  la qualité nutritionnelle des aliments et de comparer les aliments entre eux, pour aider les consommateurs à éventuellement choisir une alternative plus favorable sur le plan nutritionnel soit  dans une autre catégorie correspondant à l’usage que l’on souhaite faire de l’aliment, soit au sein de la même catégorie en choisissant un meilleur Nutri-Score ou la marque proposant l’aliment le mieux classé.

Il est aussi essentiel de rappeler une règle majeure du Nutri-Score, ce qui n’apparait jamais dans les fake news : le fait d’être classé D et E pour un aliment ne veut pas dire qu’il ne doit pas du tout être consommé. Dans le cadre d’une alimentation équilibrée, il peut être intégré mais le consommateur averti saura, s’il ne souhaite pas choisir une alternative de meilleure qualité nutritionnelle et qu’il souhaite maintenir son choix pour un produit D et E, qu’il vaut mieux qu’il le consomme en plus petite quantité et/ou moins fréquemment.    

Le problème de classement des aliments mis en cause, comme la comparaison entre l’huile d’olive et du Coca-Cola zéro, est-il spécifique au Nutri-Score ? Comment les autres logos les classent-ils ?

Comme tous les logos nutritionnels sont bâtis sur les données correspondant à leur composition nutritionnelle, tous les logos coloriels comme le Traffic Light au Royaume Uni ou l’ENL  soutenu par certaines multinationales, décrivent pour l’huile d’olive deux « rouges » compte-tenu de sa composition en graisses saturées et en graisses totales tandis que le Coca-Cola zéro affiche 4 « verts » (voire figure ci-dessous). De même ,dans le cas des avertissements sanitaires soutenus en Amérique Latine, au Canada ou en Israël  le Coca-Cola zéro n’affiche aucun avertissement. Donc quel que soit le système, l’huile d’olive est moins bien classée compte-tenu de son contenu en calories, graisses totales et graisses saturées. Mais curieusement si cette critiques revient fortement pour le Nutri-Score, personne ne s’est offusquée  de ce problème de classement pour le Traffic Lights Multiples britannique et cela n’a d’ailleurs pas posé de problèmes pour les consommateurs des chaines de distribution qui utilisent déjà depuis de longues années ce type de logo (en Espagne, au Portugal ou au Royaume Uni) et qui positionnent également plus mal l’huile d’olive que le Coca-Cola zéro.


Traffic lights multiple MTL (en haut) et ENL (en bas)


  • 3. Fake news concernant le fait que le Nutri-Score serait adapté à la France et non aux autres pays européens

« Le Nutri-Score est franco-français et n’est pas adapté aux autres pays d’Europe. Les adaptations faites dans son calcul ont été faites pour faire plaisir à son secteur fromager »

Une autre « fake-news » circulant sur internet est le fait que la France aurait fait une exception spécifique sur le calcul de l’algorithme pour les fromages afin d’améliorer l’image des fromages qui font partie de son patrimoine culinaire! Ceci est bien sur totalement faux. En fait, le Nutri-Score a fait, au cours de son développement en 2015-2016,  l’objet d’adaptations à la marge  qui ne modifiaient pas les éléments pris en compte pour le calcul du score de base (qui permet d’attribuer les différentes couleurs du Nutri-Score) au niveau de l’ensemble des aliments. Les éléments « négatifs » du calcul sont ceux qui figurent dans la déclaration nutritionnelle obligatoire au niveau européen et qui sont cités dans l’étiquetage obligatoire en face arrière des emballages (calories, lipides totaux, graisses saturées, sodium qui sont d’ailleurs les seules éléments disponibles pour tous les aliments). Les adaptations mineures du mode de calcul ont été faites pour les fromages, les matières grasses et les boissons. Cela provient du fait qu’après l’analyse en 2015 de l’Agence Française de Sécurité Sanitaire des aliments (ANSES)  ces 3 catégories (il s’agit bien de catégories pas d’aliments spécifiques) ont été reconnues  comme soulevant des problèmes spécifiques aisés à régler (sans remettre en cause le choix des nutriments rentrant dans le calcul de l’algorithme):

  1. Pour les fromages, du fait de leur composition élevée en acides gras saturés, la teneur en protéines (utilisée pour refléter la teneur en calcium et fer dans l’algorithme de calcul du Nutri-Score) n’était pas comptabilisée dans le calcul du Nutri-Score et se trouvaient tous classés en E. Or les fromages sont une source importante de calcium. De ce fait, il a été considéré que l’algorithme présentait une incohérence, puisqu’il ne prenait pas bien en compte la contribution du fromage aux apports en calcium. De la même façon, il ne permettait pas de distinguer des différences de teneurs en sel et/ou en graisses. Avec la modification, la grande majorité des fromages est classée en D (ce qui est cohérent avec les recommandations nutritionnelles qui visent à ne pas pousser à des consommations importantes de fromages), allant par ailleurs du C (pour les fromages frais peu salés) au E (pour les fromages affinés salés).
  2. Toutes les graisses ajoutées étaient dans la même catégorie, or il était clair qu’il était nécessaire de discriminer entre les graisses animales plus riches en acides gras saturés (beurre) et les graisses végétales moins riches en graisses saturées (huile, margarines), en cohérence avec les repères nutritionnels en population générale. La modification qui a été faite à l’algorithme a permis de discriminer les deux groupes puisque les matières grasses animales sont toutes en E (avec l’huile de palme), à la différence des huiles végétales et margarines végétales.

3. Pour les boissons la modification faite à l’algorithme original a été liée au fait que les boissons ont une densité différente des produits solides, et qu’elles contiennent principalement du sucre. L’adaptation a été réalisée surtout pour que l’eau soit la seule boisson classée en A (et éviter que les boissons édulcorées soient classées au même niveau que l’eau, compte tenu des composés pris en compte dans le calcul).

  • Quelles leçons tirer de ces problèmes de comparaisons d’aliments véhiculées par les fake news

Même si, comme précédemment évoqué, la comparaison (non justifiée) des scores nutritionnels de certains aliments n’est pas adaptée et apparait comme une critique non pertinente en terme de réalité pratique (comme celle du Coca-Cola Zéro et de l’huile d’olive ), et bien que Nutri-Score fonctionne parfaitement bien pour l’extrême majorité des aliments, les positionnements nutritionnels de l’huile d’olive et du Coca Zéro dans l’échelle Nutri-Score (liés au calcul de son algorithme de base) soulève tout de même de vraies questions en termes de santé  publique dont sont tout à fait conscients les scientifiques travaillant dans la conception du système depuis sa mise en place. Même si elles ne sont pas de même nature que les fake news, certains éléments concernant le positionnement de quelques rares aliments au regard des recommandations de santé publique nécessitent une réaction à court ou moyen terme :

– Pour l’huile d’olive, ce n’est pas tant une comparaison non pertinente à d’autres aliments (qui n’ont rien à voir en terme d’usage) qui pose problème mais plutôt le fait que l’huile d’olive (classée D) est, certes mieux placée que les matières grasses animales (classées E) ou que les huiles très riches en acides gras saturées (coco, palme,…), mais elle est moins bien classée que les huiles de colza (qui sont classées en C). Or les recommandations nutritionnelles de santé publique dans quasi tous les pays européens visent à privilégier les matières grasses végétales plutôt qu’animales (ce qui est couvert par la forme initiale du Nutri-Score), mais recommandent également de privilégier, et notamment en fonction des cultures alimentaires, les huiles d’olive, de colza et de noix (ce qui n’est pas le cas, l’huile d’olive et l’huile de noix étant moins bien classée que l’huile de colza).
Des discussions sont en cours avec différents chercheurs en France et en Europe  pour permettre à Nutri-Score, en valorisant les huiles d’olive et de noix  dans la prise en compte des points positifs du calcul de l’algorithme de base du Nutri-Score (mais sans modifier l’algorithme) de corriger cette anomalie. Les huiles d’olive et de noix sont alors classée en C comme l‘ huiles de colza et font partie des trois huiles les mieux classées …. Un arrêté modificatif de l’arrêté du 31 octobre 2017, donnerait la cohérence nécessaire entre les recommandations nutritionnelles françaises (publiées par Santé Publique France en janvier 2019) mais aussi européennes et mondiales et le classement des huiles dans le Nutri-Score.

– Pour les édulcorants, il est prévu que ce point soit rediscuté lors du bilan qui sera fait en 2021 et  dans le cadre de la discussion avec les différents états qui seront engagés dans le processus. D’éventuelles lacunes qui pourraient être identifiées à l’usage ou des progrès possibles dans la construction de l’algorithme liés à l’évolution des connaissances scientifiques et/ou de la situation juridique en Europe (prise en compte sucres libres, ….) seront également rediscutés pour le futur à l’occasion du bilan.

Enfin il faut également rappeler clairement que le Nutri-Score comme tous les logos nutritionnels sur la face avant des emballages des aliments n’est qu’un seul des éléments d’une politique nutritionnelle de santé publique. Il doit bénéficier d’un accompagnement pédagogique (actions d’information,  communication et éducation auprès du grand public et des professionnels de santé, du social, de l’éducation,…) quant à son utilisation, sa signification, son intérêt et ses limites. Il s’inscrit en complémentarité des autres mesures de santé publique et notamment toute les actions de communication sur les recommandations génériques de consommation en termes de groupes alimentaires et notamment le fait de consommer plutôt des produits bruts et des produits issus d’une agriculture utilisant le moins de pesticides possibles (aliments  bios).

CONCLUSION                                                                                     

Finalement, il est légitime qu’il y ait débat autour du Nutri-Score et que chacun fasse entendre sa voix et puisse poser ses questions (scientifiques, consommateurs, industriels, journalistes, spécialistes ou profanes,…), mais il est important que le débat reste constructif et honnête.

Le Nutri-Score, tant dans sa construction que sa validation, repose sur des bases scientifiques très solides (avec plus de 30 publications scientifiques dans des revues internationales à comité de lecture) démontrant son efficacité et sa supériorité par rapport à tous les autres systèmes de logo nutritionnel (qui n’ont pas un dossier scientifique aussi convaincant).

Au travers de critiques focalisées et disproportionnées niant les intérêts multiples de Nutri-Score, le jeu des lobbys ne vise qu’à empêcher le déploiement du Nutri-Score en Europe…  pour garder le statu quo, qui reste peu convaincant et peu utile pour le consommateur.